Friday, August 27, 2010

Hands On Fun!


We are off and running in the new school year! Lots of great new books, new ideas, and a new attitude. I'm excited about it all.

This week, we enjoyed our first hands on activity: we made a (sugar and HFCS laden) model of the human cell.

We are using Apologia's Anatomy and Physiology as our science curriculum this year. Wrapping up the first lesson calls for making a hilarious model, especially because of my stand on the ingredients. Last year we studied Apologia's Flying Creatures of the Fifth Day and gleaned a lot out of it. I really enjoy how the material is geared for reading aloud and for children. Not a normal text, by any stretch of the imagination. Naturally, I also appreciate the creation viewpoint and the tie in to Scripture.

Since we had plenty of materials (you can't buy just ten Starburst , ya' know), we decided to invite the other camp homeschooling families!

I premade the yellow Jell-o with extra geletin, then we read about each organelle before slicing an entry spot for the piece of candy representing it. When all organelles were in, we turned the cell upside down onto a plate. Voila!

It was a wonderful review. We had forgotten details (seems our minds are just warming up for school, I guess) and this helped visualize and store the info again.

Here is the breakdown:
Jell-O = cytoplasm
jelly bean = mitochondria
Skittles = lysomes
Starburst Juicers = Golgi body
Large gumball = nucleus
Fruit roll up = endoplasmic reticulum
Cake sprinkles = ribosomes


From our school to yours: Try having at least one hands on activity/craft/experiment a week in your school (not every day, that would wear a mama out!). It doesn't have to be as elaborate as the one in this post. It could simply be something like we did this other time. If your curriculum doesn't have something or the idea they list is too time intensive than you like, you can Google a topic you are studying and find something you would like to do. Varying the subjects that get hands on focus helps everyone- science shouldn't get all the fun! Including as many of the senses as we can is a good thing for our students. Hands on helps!